Work, Motor, teasing……

With the holidays and big doings with the family our blog had been on the back burner.   However we have been working on the boat and are making progress.

Here is a photo of our new spreaders.

New spreaders on a the mast

New spreaders on a the mast

Motor Work

Bare block...

Bare block…

had a cool spell lately and that has slowed down the motor rebuild. I have been working on it none the less.

I have previously rebuilt motorcycle engines but this is definitely a step more complex.  Even if the Atomic 4 is a simple four cylinder.

Studs installed waiting for crank bearings and crank.

Studs installed waiting for crank  and the top bearings.

I made a point to use assembly lube on all the parts as it will be a few seconds before the oil pump lubes everything up. Note in this picture the cam shaft is in place.  It actually goes in after the crank and pistons.

The crank shaft is in and waiting for pistons.

The crank shaft is in and waiting for pistons.

I had a hammer handy, thankfully it was not needed.

IMG_5432The pistons are numbered and the 1 thru 4 with an arrow that needs to point towards the rear of the motor (not the front as it says on the piston). Of course I got this wrong and had to turn all the pistons 180 degrees after install.

After installing all new rings on the pistons I used a ring compressor tool to slide the piston down the bore.

New piston rings.  The top 2 are compression rings and the bottom is an oil sweeper.

New piston rings. The top 2 are compression rings and the bottom is an oil sweeper.

Piston ring compressor

Piston ring compressor

I borrowed the tool for free  from AutoZone for a $10 deposit.  It worked fine until the last piston.  I had checked the gap on the ring by placing them in the bore before install but by the fourth piston and everything working well I did not.  Of course that meant ring 2 was not gapped correctly.   This is thankfully were my previous experience helped. A bit of grinding and the piston was in.

Tappets

Tappets

After the pistons were installed I put the 8 tappets in and then the Cam shaft making sure to line up the timing marks. Next up was the valves.

Valve after lapping into the block using grinding compound.

Valve after lapping into the block using grinding compound.

First each valve (in numbered bags) was cleaned and then lapped to match its seat.  Since the block had been cleaned this was required but not a big hassle.  The valves cleaned up nice and matched the well.   The only problem I had was the number 2 intake valve was bent.  I had to take an intake valve off of my donor motor to replace it.

After all the valve were lapped it was time to reinstall the springs.

Valve spring, 2 wedges and keeper.

Valve spring, 2 wedges and keeper.

The valve springs had to be placed with the keeper on the bottom. After that the valve with the stem lubed is dropped in. Then the spring is compressed using a tool bought on Amazon.

With the spring and keeper compressed the wedges in place.

With the spring and keeper compressed the wedges in place.

Although a bit fiddly the valve springs went in pretty easily.

Yay, valves.  The cloth is in place to keep the wedges from falling down into the oil pan through the holes in the bottom of the spring gallery.

Yay, valves. The cloth is in place to keep the wedges from falling down into the oil pan through the holes in the bottom of the spring gallery.

Next up, studs, head, gearbox, flywheel, etc.

Coming attractions

Big really big announcement.  Mast step, running rigging, standing rigging, wiring the mast.  Oh so much…

FCC, seeping, sails and dinner

FCC
Friday we received a letter from the FCC. In it our call sign and MMSI code for our AIS and VHF radio.

What a pleasant surprise, and now we are official, Lori Bell is in the worldwide data base.

 

Ok,  I started this post on my iPhone.  It takes much more effort to peck in a post on that thing.  I tend to be less verbose and not flush out my thoughts as much when typing on it.

First off let me say I really enjoy WordPress as a service.   I use their reader to follow a number of other sailing blogs and enjoy them immensely.

Here are two examples.

http://katieandjessieonaboat.com/2014/10/22/chicken-noodle-naked/

and

http://artofhookie.org/2014/10/20/rolling-with-the-taco/

These are just so well done,  as our blog tends to dwell on the grind of boat repair these blogs give us inspiration of what is ahead when we finish.

AIS and the FCC

Automatic Identification System-  basically our boat will ping so other boat so equipped can see us on their plotters/radar.

Here is an what it looks like on a plotter, Port Canaveral.

http://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais/home/zoom:13/centerx:-80.6074/centery:28.4409

If you are lucky you can catch a cruise ship coming and going.

Anyhow,  a little over a week ago we applied at the FCC for a MMSI and call sign for Lori Bell.  By Saturday when we got back from the boat there was a letter in the mailbox with our assignments.  Wow, what super turn around, good job FCC.

FCC letter, blocks for back haul, boom end for goose neck, piston rings.

FCC letter, blocks for back haul, boom end for goose neck, piston rings.

What a photo

This photo encompasses the major themes of the work on the Bell.  Finishing the electronic, FCC letter.  Rigging the mast and boom, out haul blocks and goose neck. Engine Rebuild, piston rings.

Before the Mast

Mast work continues apace.  The Alodine finish seems to be holding up nicely and is unchanged after two weeks.

New spreader brackets on the mast.

New spreader and brackets on the mast.

Here is a photo of the old spreaders, their poor condition one of our prime motivations on restoring the mast.

In order, Port Spreader, rotten, 37 inches, Catalina Yachts new aluminum spreader 36", Starboard spreader, rotten 34"

In order, Port Spreader rotten 37 “, Catalina Yachts new aluminum spreader 36″, Starboard spreader rotten 34″

Why are the two old spreaders of differing lengths you ask?  Well good question, surely this was some new type of asymmetrical rig?  My guess, no.

My task for the rest of this week is to figure out how to attach our AIS antenna, signal flag halyard and deck light to the spreaders with a minimal amount of drilling.   I have some ideas of what may work, we shall see.

 

Critter photo

Manatees fighting over fresh water.

Manatees fighting over fresh water.

Our neighbor was washing his boat and a good six manatees were jockeying for position under the scuppers to get a drink.

Hoping for a number, ropes and such…

Numbers – Radio and AIS information that need to be done.

Today I was looking at AIS class B transceivers to go with our VHF DCS radio.

In reading about features and such on our VHF and and AIS we will need to program both with an MMSI number.  What is an MMSI number?  Well it is a nine-digit number “Maritime Mobile Service Identity ” that when you use a digital radio or such identifies your boat in a Data base.

If you are not leaving the United States an MMSI number can be had for free at Towboat US.

http://www.boatus.com/mmsi/

They put it in a stateside database that the Coast Guard uses.   However this database does not work overseas in places like, well the Bahamas for example.  For that you need to sign up with the FCC and actually get a number licensed to your boat.    Uggggg.

http://www.fcc.gov/

First you will need a FRN number and login, you get this by entering yourself in the FCC database.

https://apps.fcc.gov/coresWeb/publicHome.do

After you get your FRN you apply with an form  605 available here.

http://www.fcc.gov/forms

It states you may also have to do a 159,160 or 1070y,  I did not have to myself, even though I spent a few hours fighting with these forms (going in numeric order) until giving up and doing the 605.  It allowed me to pay the fee online and they sent me a receipt.

When filling out the 605 you enter emergency contacts and some basic ships data that will go into the Coast Guard database.   Cost from FCC $215. Good for 10 years.

http://www.defender.com/product3.jsp?path=-1|135|2028691|2028908&id=1849984

Castings

Last week we removed our boom end castings and the mast step to be media blasted and powder coated.   Heard back from the fellow doing the work and it seems our goose neck end casting is shot.

Cracked casting

Cracked casting

Before picture with the casting installed in mast.

Before picture with the casting installed in mast.

This is the type of thing that can only be found by disassembling.  Lori and I got lucky we in deciding to get the ends made pretty again as we could have skipped the step and someday we could be running downwind and Gybe just to have the casting fracture under load.  Not good.

We have a call in to Catalina Yachts for a new casting.  If they can not supply one I have found one from Catalina Direct we can use but it requires a bit of cutting to make fit.  Hopefully Catalina comes through for us.

Also blasted was the mast step.

Shiney blasted mast step.

Shiny blasted mast step.

Ropes

We decided not to attach our shackles to our halyards with spliced eyes.  Opting instead for the flexibility of knots. So I finished whipping the ends of the running rigging we have on hand.  We do have two more halyards coming as we have the sheaves for 4 at the masthead and a mid mast sheave for a storm sail.

Whipping the ends

Whipping the ends

Working away

Working away

Tools of the trade.

Tools of the trade.

Finished but to trim the loose ends.

Finished but to trim the loose ends.

We also purchased some end dip in case we did not like the results of the old school whipping.   I prefer whipping but since we had the dip we opted to coat the whipped ends just for good measure.

Stuff in a bottle.

Stuff in a bottle.

Running rigging whipped, dipped and ready.

Running rigging whipped, dipped and ready.

Waiting

Hawk in our yard.

Hawk in our yard.

I think this guy is waiting for Abby to come out and play.  He let me within 10 feet or so.

Now we are getting someplace. Outhauls, blocks, tillers, spars.

Spar work continues.

We received new stripper disks in the mail.

Norton Non-Woven Depressed Center Rapid Strip Wheel
Link: http://amzn.com/B00755XY2Y

Wow, these things work great.   I was able to strip the boom and finish stripping the mast with just 3 of the 5 I ordered.  If we had not chemically stripped half the mast 5 or 6 would have done the entire project.  As they say in the reviews, let the grinder and gravity do the work.  The entire process reminded me of running an orbital buffer back as a junior enlisted in the Navy.

Stripping away the old paint. Grinder works well.

Stripping away the old paint. Grinder works well.

After stripping and polishing up the chemically stripped side we started to apply the Alodine.

Left is after alodine, right is raw aluminum, before treatment.

Left is after alodine, right is raw aluminum, before treatment.

Half way thru treating with Alodine

Half way thru treating with Alodine.

Boom treated.

Boom treated.

The alodine as I understand it is ChromicAcid and possibly Iodine.  It smells of Iodine.  It leaves a things looking browned and with blue rainbow swirls.  A rather interesting one of a kind look.

Working on the boom we discovered the outhaul is not functioning, it seems jammed up.

I removed all the hardware,

Sheaves, outhaul car from the boom.

Sheaves, outhaul car from the boom.

I removed the end caps from the boom,  those as well as the the mast step are going to be powder coated.

Mast step removed.

Mast step removed. This is the part on deck the mast sits on. Held down to the deck by 4 bolts.  It fits inside the base of the mast and is normally not visible.

Once the end caps were off the boom I had to remove the old outhaul setup.  It had been bolted in at mid boom and I had to use a big screwdriver and hammer to sheer off the last 2 bolts that had not rotted off.

Out came this.

Harken magic outhaul.  Seized up for some reason.

Harken magic outhaul. Seized up for some reason.

I have ordered 2 new blocks and plan on reusing the old jib halyard to build a new 6 to 1 internal outhaul.

Old jib halyard.

Old jib halyard sitting on the old standing rigging which is going to the shop.

Heading in the right direction.

Whats that? A new tiller is what it is. We can actually steer our rudder.

Whats that? A new tiller is what it is.

Also in addition to putting on our new tiller our new Mainsail is done and ready to be picked up.    We have our old standing rigging in the Escape and will be giving that to Mr Morgan to make us new.

The engine block and head are at machine shop getting cleaned and sleeved.

Abby approves of the work.

Abby approves of the work.

Another list.

It’s lunch an I want to organize my brain. Here goes with yet another To Do list.

Motor
Besides the complete rebuild
Controls, gauges, wiring harness, fresh water cooling, fuel tank sorting, alignment with the shaft.

Mast
Bring standing to Mr Morgan for fabrication of all new stuff, finish stripping and alodine treatment, new running rigging install. Rewire of mast. Drilling deck plate.

Deck
Fix bow pulpit break, replace bent stanchion, install bow roller and Mantis anchor, remove old head vent and seal hole, rebed fresh water deck fitting as they leak, weather board for companionway. Install tiller.

Electronics
Install AIS,VHF and chart plotter and network all together. Install new 12v outlets port side. Install 2 more light fixtures, one for galley and one for Nav station, Finish running light upgrade install. Buy and install auto pilot and network it.

Other

Purchase Achilles lt4 tender.

Pistons and Spars

Spar Work

More spar work done last weekend.

Angle grinder on boom, a photo study.

Angle grinder on boom, a photo study.

After stripping half of the mast last weekend we opted to try angle grinder stripper disks as we did not care for the results of the stripper.

We were gave these disks a try.

3M 9682 SandBlaster 4-1/2-Inch Multi-Grit Surface Conditioning Disc
by 3M
Link: http://amzn.com/B000BPC1J2

The first issue we had is this type of disk requires an adapter be purchased for the grinder.  $12 for the adapter and $12 for 3 disks.

They actually worked.

Stripping the boom.

Stripping the boom.

The boom 60% done.

The boom 60% done.

Unfortunately they wore thru too quickly.  6 Disks ( 2 packs) got us about 60% of the boom done.  They wore out quick and started to wear down the adapter.

We ordered some Norton stripper disks for the grinder,  hopefully we get everything stripped and polished next weekend and can treat both spars with Alodine.

Pistons

We are pretty much done stripping down the motor.

This afternoon I removed the pistons,crank shaft and cam shaft.

Crank sans pistons and rods

Crank sans pistons and rods

Interesting in that all the rods are marked with the cylinder number (1 thru 4) Makes it easy to keep them in order.

Interesting in that all the rods are marked with the cylinder number (1 thru 4) Makes it easy to keep them in order.

Piston and rod in my dirty hand.

Piston and rod in my dirty hand.

All that is left is to drift out the bearing surfaces for the camshaft (hope to reuse) and remove the bolt and screw on the oil galleys.  A few minutes work hopefully.

Next will be taking the block and head to the machine shop for a hot dip and have the motor resleeved.

Looking at our early model head I came across something that worried me.

Water jacket erosion in early model head

Water jacket erosion in early model head

More erosion

More erosion

I worry that the jacket is too far gone to be worth using.   My new style head has no such erosion.  I was hoping to go with the old style and forgo a thermostat but may have no choice in the matter.

In closing

Abby dog says " Hello, I love running in the yard. It is much more fun than being in my kennel."

Abby dog says ” Hello, I love running in the yard. It is much more fun than being in my kennel.”

Ropes in the mail. Rigging that stands and runs.

Running

Received our new running rigging today.

Abby approves.

IMG_5243.JPG

IMG_5245.JPG

IMG_5244.JPG

I promptly busted out our waxed whipping twine and got to work.

IMG_5247.JPG

IMG_5249.JPG

I still have to splice the shackles on the halyards but they are currently on the boat.

Standing

We picked up our repaired jib last weekend and put a deposit on a new main.

Scott stopped by the mast today to verify some measurements and suggested replacement of the standing rigging. Well, no surprise there. It will be nice to know the rigging will be top notch.

In closing

I leave with a photo of BB16, from a time when men were men, ships were steal and burnt coal.

IMG_5242.JPG

Life Before the Mast, or working on the mast anyway.

Last weekend was pretty productive.   Lori and I arrived out at the boat Friday night and were happy to find our mast down on stands and ready to be worked on.

Our virgin mast before we went to work.

Our virgin mast before we went to work.

Sails

First thing Saturday morning before we could work on the mast we had to take our sails, a main and genoa(jib), to a local loft.

Sails By Morgan

229 Forrest Avenue
Cocoa, FL 32922

Hold on, this is not a Royal Enfield, blimey, it is an Atomic 4!!

A few years back I decided to cut my teeth on motorcycles.   Being the yahoo I am my friend Ray told me about Royal Enfields. A Brit bike now made in India that at the time no one had.   What could go wrong.

My 95 Royal Enfield.  The first year they were brought into the states by Classic Motorworks.  Now they make a much improved version.

My 95 Royal Enfield. The first year they were brought into the states by Classic Motorworks. Now they make a much improved version.

Suffice it to say the bikes, I now own 3 Enfields and 1 Harley Davidson and one of the Enfields even runs, taught me how to wrench on motors.

I have had cranks rebuilt, replaced heads, rebuilt transmissions,  configured carbs, replaced chains,  you name it I have done it.   Funny thing is most of these things did not break on their own,,,  well some did, possibly 40% or so broke.  A lot of the work I did because I wanted to learn the ropes.  Now I am greatful I did.

Atomic 4 Time!!

I am making progress on the tear down.  I had hit a roadblock of 2 corroded and stripped bolts behind the starter that were keeping me from removing the flywheel housing.

Stripped stainless bolt with a liberal application of PB blaster

Stripped stainless bolt with a liberal application of PB blaster

Monday I got my Craftsman stripped bolt remover tool in the mail.     As a skeptic and from experience with motorcycles I worried that the tool would be more of a gimmick and I would end up grinding, drilling and tapping the bolt and hole.

The tool worked like a champ.

Bolt and extractor/removal tool.  Craftsman #7

Bolt and extractor/removal tool. Craftsman #7

Allowing me now to remove the oil pan and  have access for removing the crank.

Cranks and pistons

Cranks rods and pistons. The clock is now upside down with oil pan removed.

Things look pretty good inside the crankcase.  There does not appear to be any apparent corrosion on any of the innards.

Aft end of the crank with oil screen visible.

Aft end of the crank with oil screen visible.

Funny thing, on my Enfield the oil filter is cotton gauze wrapped around a metal tube.  At the time I thought it was quite a cheesy setup (the motor was designed in the UK in the 1950s).   It turns out the Atomic 4 has no oil filter,  just the screen seen on the above pickup from the sump.

I now need to remove the crank and pistons and then I will place another call to the Machine shop in Titusville.  I plan to reuse the pistons and just replace the rings.

I am very much looking forward to the rebuild process,  I want to do this right and get it done.

Mast

I guess I will be calling Westland Marina again and asking them to take my mast off the stand.  I actually like the place but I have had to ask them 5 times and they still have yet to take it down so I can paint, rewire and rerig it.  Uggg..nup

Cleanup

Last summer I bought some Orange oil as I had read it not only cleans but kills bugs in addition to preserving wood.

Nature's Wisdom Orange Oil Concentrate by Nature's Wisdom
Nature’s Wisdom Orange Oil Concentrate
by Nature’s Wisdom
Link: http://amzn.com/B0012YEKAE
I had not used it until this past winter when on a lark I put some on a towel and wiped away a drip of Navy Blue paint on the side of the Bell.  It worked well,  I then started to use it to clean my hands after painting.   Also worked like a champ and is not toxic.
Now I have been using it to clean oil and grease off my skin when working on the motor.    Wow, it is wonderful stuff, and it smells good and is non toxic.

UPDATE!! Yes, I have been tardy.

Knocking the rust of my the blog.   Were to start..

Dog Days Of Summer.. A New crew member.

 

 Charlie, our 2+ year old Jack Russell is no longer with us.  He was attacked and killed by a Shepard Mix on July 6th.  A pretty horrible experience.

Lori and I miss him greatly and rather quickly we located another JRT.   Abby was 4 months old when we bought her.  She is pedigreed and papered but we don’t plan on breading her.

Abby on a car ride.

Abby on a car ride.

Abby climbing the furniture.

Abby climbing the furniture.

She is pretty awesome but we had forgotten how much work puppies are.

Boat work.

Not much has been going on.  Plodding along on the Bell.

Our new tiller and cover has arrived. 

New Tiller

New Tiller, Pretty laminated wood.

No sooner had it arrived in the house than Abby had the idea it was a good chew toy for teething on.  It now sits high out of reach of the toothy puppy. Lucky for us she did not do any damage besides scaring us.

Cockpit

We finally finished the cockpit floor.   Applying a layer of Kiwi Grip and painted the gunnels.

Cockpit Floor done, not the missing tiller.

Cockpit Floor done, not the missing tiller.

bell

We also installed some Pyramid 4″ speakers in the cockpit.  They work very well and we tried to place them so they would not be blocked when people are lounging about.   You can see them in the first picture.

We also installed the original crib boards to replace the rotten plywood swing doors on the companionway.  

Hinged crib boards, also not the rotten weather board fell of the hatch above.

Hinged crib boards, also not the rotten weather board fell of the hatch above.

The top two hinged boards lift off the hinges.  Good, as now we can remove them and install our companionway screen when out on the hook.  The plywood doors were fix with non stainless hardware so in addition to rotting they were rusting.  I am glad they are gone.

Motor work.

I actually have been working on the motor.  My last post I mentioned I had bought a second mill on Ebay.   I have been working on breaking it down.

Head removed, valves pulled, studs removed.

Head removed, valves pulled, studs removed.

Transmission and water pump removed.

Transmission and water pump removed.

Transmission guts.

Transmission guts.

Flywheel removed

Flywheel removed

With a lot of the weight pulled off the motor I felt safer tipping it up and draining the oil out of the pan.

With a lot of the weight pulled off the motor I felt safer tipping it up and draining the oil out of the pan.

This afternoon I attempted to remove the flywheel housing.  Unlucky for me two of the bolts are seized due to corrosion.  I hit them with PB blaster and hope to get them out in the next day or so. Once the flywheel housing is removed we can flip the motor over and remove the oilpan, crank and pistons.  Once that is done it is off to the machine shop for new sleeve and then we start rebuilding it.  Sweet. 

Mast Work

The mast was scheduled to be put down on barrels last Friday.  I had to work last weekend so do not know if it has been moved of the storage rack or not.  Hopefully this weekend we can start prepping and painting it.   We will be rewiring and placing new spreaders, antennas, lights and other hardware.