Ropes in the mail. Rigging that stands and runs.

Running

Received our new running rigging today.

Abby approves.

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I promptly busted out our waxed whipping twine and got to work.

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I still have to splice the shackles on the halyards but they are currently on the boat.

Standing

We picked up our repaired jib last weekend and put a deposit on a new main.

Scott stopped by the mast today to verify some measurements and suggested replacement of the standing rigging. Well, no surprise there. It will be nice to know the rigging will be top notch.

In closing

I leave with a photo of BB16, from a time when men were men, ships were steal and burnt coal.

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Life Before the Mast, or working on the mast anyway.

Last weekend was pretty productive.   Lori and I arrived out at the boat Friday night and were happy to find our mast down on stands and ready to be worked on.

Our virgin mast before we went to work.

Our virgin mast before we went to work.

Sails

First thing Saturday morning before we could work on the mast we had to take our sails, a main and genoa(jib), to a local loft.

Sails By Morgan

229 Forrest Avenue
Cocoa, FL 32922

Hold on, this is not a Royal Enfield, blimey, it is an Atomic 4!!

A few years back I decided to cut my teeth on motorcycles.   Being the yahoo I am my friend Ray told me about Royal Enfields. A Brit bike now made in India that at the time no one had.   What could go wrong.

My 95 Royal Enfield.  The first year they were brought into the states by Classic Motorworks.  Now they make a much improved version.

My 95 Royal Enfield. The first year they were brought into the states by Classic Motorworks. Now they make a much improved version.

Suffice it to say the bikes, I now own 3 Enfields and 1 Harley Davidson and one of the Enfields even runs, taught me how to wrench on motors.

I have had cranks rebuilt, replaced heads, rebuilt transmissions,  configured carbs, replaced chains,  you name it I have done it.   Funny thing is most of these things did not break on their own,,,  well some did, possibly 40% or so broke.  A lot of the work I did because I wanted to learn the ropes.  Now I am greatful I did.

Atomic 4 Time!!

I am making progress on the tear down.  I had hit a roadblock of 2 corroded and stripped bolts behind the starter that were keeping me from removing the flywheel housing.

Stripped stainless bolt with a liberal application of PB blaster

Stripped stainless bolt with a liberal application of PB blaster

Monday I got my Craftsman stripped bolt remover tool in the mail.     As a skeptic and from experience with motorcycles I worried that the tool would be more of a gimmick and I would end up grinding, drilling and tapping the bolt and hole.

The tool worked like a champ.

Bolt and extractor/removal tool.  Craftsman #7

Bolt and extractor/removal tool. Craftsman #7

Allowing me now to remove the oil pan and  have access for removing the crank.

Cranks and pistons

Cranks rods and pistons. The clock is now upside down with oil pan removed.

Things look pretty good inside the crankcase.  There does not appear to be any apparent corrosion on any of the innards.

Aft end of the crank with oil screen visible.

Aft end of the crank with oil screen visible.

Funny thing, on my Enfield the oil filter is cotton gauze wrapped around a metal tube.  At the time I thought it was quite a cheesy setup (the motor was designed in the UK in the 1950s).   It turns out the Atomic 4 has no oil filter,  just the screen seen on the above pickup from the sump.

I now need to remove the crank and pistons and then I will place another call to the Machine shop in Titusville.  I plan to reuse the pistons and just replace the rings.

I am very much looking forward to the rebuild process,  I want to do this right and get it done.

Mast

I guess I will be calling Westland Marina again and asking them to take my mast off the stand.  I actually like the place but I have had to ask them 5 times and they still have yet to take it down so I can paint, rewire and rerig it.  Uggg..nup

Cleanup

Last summer I bought some Orange oil as I had read it not only cleans but kills bugs in addition to preserving wood.

Nature's Wisdom Orange Oil Concentrate by Nature's Wisdom
Nature’s Wisdom Orange Oil Concentrate
by Nature’s Wisdom
Link: http://amzn.com/B0012YEKAE
I had not used it until this past winter when on a lark I put some on a towel and wiped away a drip of Navy Blue paint on the side of the Bell.  It worked well,  I then started to use it to clean my hands after painting.   Also worked like a champ and is not toxic.
Now I have been using it to clean oil and grease off my skin when working on the motor.    Wow, it is wonderful stuff, and it smells good and is non toxic.