Brackets, Bases and Boom Bonanza

Here I go attempting to compose a post on my Galaxy Tab using a blue tooth keyboard. Bear with me here as i have no auto correct or spell checker.

Base

Yesterday we received our stroller car seat combo in the mail.  I took it on myself to install the seat base this morning before Lori departed to her Mother, Daughter banquet with her mom.

image

Here it is,  note the dog slobber pad on the seat. Poor Lucky has a nervous condition that causes him to drool uncontrollably every time he sets foot in a car.   The pad keeps the slobber in his towel and off the seat.

Backs Stay

After Lori departed for her event I wrangled up the pups and headed for the boat.  First task on arrival was replacing the incorrect clevis pins on the split back stay. The rig still needs tuning but i have eliminated the fear of imminent collapse that has haunted me.

image

Half baked split pin.

Ok, I gave up on the Galaxy Tab, the App was just horrible, I had to publish as it would not save a draft to the web..  Arrrg

Fixed, new clevis and split pin.

Fixed, new clevis and split pin.

After getting the back stay in better shape I proceeded to move on to fixing the boom, as I need it in place to lift the engine for shimming the alignment with the propeller shaft.

I still have the old pin from the fractured boom end, good thing I kept it since it is thinner than the new one that does not fit the old goose neck.

Old pin to the right, new to the left.

Old pin to the right, new to the left.

Boom end removed to replace pin.

Boom end removed to replace pin.

Of note is I used ample amounts of anti seize on both the screws and the casting.  It worked because I was able to remove the screws and casting with little effort. Win.

It is interesting that the entire boom is basically attached to the mast by one split pin.  Of course the physics allow this.

Goose neck attached to mast. finally.

Goose neck attached to mast. finally.

After attaching the boom I had to rig a topping lift to keep it off the bimini.  I had decided to use the secondary halyard as the topping lift as it can be adjusted at the base of the mast.   As luck would have it the black secondary is in fact too short to act as a topping lift.  For now I have the primary halyard as the topping lift as it is longer (runs back to the cockpit).  I may just put a short extension on the other halyard instead of buying a new longer line.  I have yet to decide.

Once the topping lift was installed the boom started to swing about and to secure it I needed to install the main sheet.   I dug the sheet out of the sail locker and proceeded to thread it through all the blocks.

Main Sheet rigged to the traveler,  6-1 purchase.

Main Sheet rigged to the traveler, 6-1 purchase.

Of course there was a lot of slack in the cockpit with the boom sheeted in, I still need to rig the traveler.

Sheet slack.

Sheet slack.

And of course closer examination reveals it is frayed.   Note to self: Replace.

Fraying of the sheet.

Fraying of the sheet.

Boom installed.

Artsy

Artsy

Of note is I removed a fair lead from the deck and replaced it with a block to the mast plate.  Here is a photo of it in action.  I have a better block for the job but need to locate it and the cabin is in a bit of disarray.

The gray spot is an epoxy repair to the holes for the old fail lead.

The gray spot is an epoxy repair to the holes for the old fair lead.

Now I can move on to engine work.

Motor

Here she is..  Our motor, Woodstock.

Here she is.. Our motor, Woodstock.

First I had to get the angle of attack of the motor and the propeller shaft to line up.  I did this by rigging a block to the boom and using the secondary halyard (extended with some scrap rope) to lift the front end.

Spare block, used to lift motor.

Spare block, used to lift motor.

I put enough extra line on the halyard that it would be able to reach the winch on the mast.  I really like these winches as the Clew did not have them and I find myself using them quite often.

I tied a large loop around the fly wheel housing using a bowline knot and put a lot of tension on the halyard.  I did not really lift the motor per say but the gave me enough assistance that I could lift and move the motor about pretty easily.

I thought I had taken more photos but guess not…

I shimmed the front motor mounts using shim that were left when the last motor was removed by the previous owner, glad I kept them.  now have the shaft and motor sitting at the same angle.

I then removed the alternator and water pump from the motor.   I have 3 alternators and plan on taking them to a local shop for testing, I will install the one they say works best.

The water pump has a weep from the weep hole so I plan on rebuilding it here at home using a kit from Moyer Marine and reinstalling in time to start the motor.

Also performed in engine bay is I moved the coil to the aft bulkhead, away from the heat and vibration of the motor.  Not a big deal but since I have the space why not.

I also installed the heat exchanger and electric fresh water pump on the forward bulkhead.  It fit nicely.  With easy access to the fill cap.

I still have a lot to do, but at least I can say the work has started.  I look forward to having the Bell move under her own power again.

Off again

Packed up with the bimini stowed, until next visit.

Packed up with the bimini stowed, until next visit.

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